The Beast in the Jungle

The escape would have been to love her; then, then he would have lived. She had lived- who could say now with what passion?-since she had loved him for himself; whereas he had never thought of her (ah, how hugely it glared at him!) but in the chill of his egotism and the light of her use. Her spoken words came back to him, and the chain stretched and stretched. The beast had lurked indeed, and the beast, at its hour, had sprung; it had sprung in the twilight o f the cold April when, pale, ill, wasted, but all beautiful, and perhaps even then recoverable, she had risen from her chair to stand before him and let him imaginably guess; it had sprung as he didn’t guess; it had sprung as she hopelessly turned from him, and the mark, by the time he left her, had fallen where it was to fall. He had justified his fear and achieved his fate; he had failed, with the last exactitude, of all he was to fail of; and a moan now rose to his lips as he remembered she had prayed he mightn’t know. This horror of waking –this was knowledge, knowledge under the breath of which the very tears in his eyes seemed to freeze.

Henry James, “The Beast in the Jungle,” in Major Stories & Essays (New York: Library of America, 1999), 489.

The beast as regret or missed opportunity? Loving as living. Knowledge as powerful as ignorance.