“She stood there until something fell off the shelf inside her. Then she went inside there to see what it was. It was her image of Jody tumbled down and shattered. But looking at it she saw that it never was the flesh and blood figure of her dreams. Just something she had grabbed up to drape her dreams over” (72).

Image shattered…absence of image, Jody demoted to an “it;” literally “objectifies;” turns him into object rather than herself.

Hurston, Zora Neale. Their Eyes Were Watching God: A Novel. New York: Perennial Library, 1990. Print.

 

Mrs. Dalloway

“…she did undoubtedly then feel what men felt. Only for a moment; but it was enough. It was a sudden revelation, a tinge like a blush which one tried to check and then, as it spread, one yielded to its expansion, and rushed to the the farthest verge and there quivered and felt the world come closer, swollen with some astonishing significance, some pressure of rapture, which split its thin skin and gushed and poured with an extraordinary alleviation over the cracks and sores” (32). 

Relationship with Sally a protest against the mundanity of Clarissa’s housewife subordination. Description sounds like conscious attempt to repress her homosexual thoughts; then, possible acceptance.

Woolf, Virginia. Mrs. Dalloway. New York: Harcourt, Brace, 1925. Print.

“Beast In the Jungle” – Henry James

“He circled about it at a distance that alternately narrowed and widened and that still wasn’t much affected by the consciousness in him that there was nothing she could “know,” after all, any better than he did. She had no source of knowledge he hadn’t equally—except of course that she might have finer nerves. That was what women had where they were interested; they made out things, where people were concerned, that the people often couldn’t have made out for themselves.”

I found that this excerpt says a lot about James’ opinion of gender differences and discrepancies. It is interesting to me that while he states that he does not believe women to “know” any more than a man does, he also states that they are often very intuitive and can know things about people that they often don’t know themselves.

Excerpt From: James, Henry. “The Beast in the Jungle.” Feedbooks, 1903. iBooks.
This material may be protected by copyright.