A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man 10/3

“He was alone. He was unheeded, happy and near to the wild heart of life. He was alone and young and wilful and wildhearted, alone amid a waste of wild air and brackish waters and the seaharvest of shells and tangle and veiled grey sunlight and gayclad lightclad figures of children and girls and voices childish and girlish in the air.” (144)

This stood out to me because of how happy and loose Stephen feels to have finally given up his deep religious feelings and to feel free in the world. This seems to be the first time he has felt like this since at least the beginning of the novel.

James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. New York: Oxford University Press, 2008. (144)

The Beast in the Jungle

“One discussed, of course, like a hunchback, for there was always a hunchback face. That remained, and she was watching him; but people watched best, as a general thing, in silence, so that such would be predominantly the manner of their vigil. Yet he didn’t want, at the same time, to be solemn; solemn was what he imagined he too much tended to be with other people. The thing to be, with the one person who knew was easy and natural, to the make the reference rather than be seeming to avoid it..”

Henry James, “The Beast in the Jungle,” in Major Stories & Essays(New York: Library of America, 1999). 458

Marcher hides behind the truth of knowing. However, it is interesting that when he finally finds May who knows the truth, he is craving the discussion of it and its almost like he yearns to set it free. May’s silence of the “beast” was like the people of a village watching the face of a hunchback man without saying a word about the clear hunch on his back.