Malgudi Days

“Attila exhibited a love of humanity which was sometimes disconcerting…It was well that Attila had no powers of speech. Otherwise he would have burst into a lamentation which would have shattered the pedestal under his feet”

Narayan, R. K. Malgudi Days: Attila. New York: Penguin, 2006. 98-101. Print.

Malgudi Days: Attila

“But as time passed our Attila exhibited a love of humanity which was sometimes disconcerting. The Scourge of Europe -could be ever have been like this? they put it down to his age. What child could help loving all creatures?”

Narayan, R. K. “”Attila”” Malgudi Days. New York: Penguin, 2006. 101. Print.

Malgudi Days: “Atilla”

“It was as well that Attila had no powers of speech. Otherwise he would have burst into a lamentation which could have shattered the pedestal under his feet.”

The irony of the incorrect assumption that Attila has captured the burglar for the protection of the family is only made possible through an indirect discourse I have never quite seen (through an animal) like, “Atilla’s greatest ambition in life was to wander in the streets freely”(100). The “powers of speech” the dog does not possess are made possible through this indirect speech that focalizes a dog, with a great humorous effect.

Narayan, R. K. “”Attila”” Malgudi Days. New York: Penguin, 2006. 101. Print.

 

Malgudi Days

“Attila exhibited a love of humanity which was sometimes disconcerting.”

Narayan, R.K. Malgudi Days. New York: Penguin, 2006. (98)

Strange that they should feel disconcerted for a dog that likes them. Opposite emotions of what you would expect. Similar to “A Father’s Help” when Swami is upset that he is not being disciplined.